Who Knew Lamentations (איכה) Was So Cool?!

The first word that comes to mind when reading Lamentations in English is hardly the word “cool”. It would probably be “depressing” or “morose”, which is why it is an appropriate book to read on the Day of Atonement/ Yom Kippur, but the way Jeremiah wrote it in Hebrew is nothing short of genius. It is similar to Psalm 119, in that Jeremiah adds a poetic element. For instance, in chapter 1 he begins each verse with the first through twenty-second Hebrew letter in their respective order. Here is a photo of the first nine verses of chapter 1:

Hebrew is read from right to left. Each verse begins with the next respective letter in the Hebrew aleph-bet. In this example we have chapter 1, verses 1 (alef – א) through verse 9 (tet – ט).
Lamentations, chapter 1, verses 10 (yod -י) through verse 19 (qoof – ק)

Chapter two repeats the sequence.

At the top we have the last 3 verses/last 3 letters of the alef-bet. Resh (ר), shin (ש) and tav (ת). Then chapter 2, verse 1 begins each verse with the aleph-bet again. Alef (א) being first.

Sidebar for chapter 2, verse 2. Do you see that stand-alone alef tav (את) highlighted in pink in the above photo? That verse literally says: Adonai has swallowed up and has not pitied ET (את)… (את representing Yeshua.) (Foreshadowing of Yeshua on the tree.)

Chapter 2, verses 7 (zayin- ז) through verse 15 (samech – ס).
Chapter 2, verses 16 (pey – פ) through the end of the chapter, verse 22 (tav – ת).

As you can see from the above photo, Jeremiah changes things up when beginning chapter 3. Now he begins three verses at a time with the Hebrew aleph-bet! For instsnce, verses 1, 2 and 3 begin with the letter aleph (א). Verses 4, 5 and 6 begin with bet (ב), etc. He writes all of chapter 3 in this sequence. Chapter three, three verse intervals!

Chapter 3, verses 8 and 9 (gimel – ג) through verses 34 and 35 (lamed – ל).
Chapter 3, verses 36 (lamed – ל) through verses 61, 62 and 63 (shin – ש)

In chapter 4 Jeremiah goes back to single verses but continues starting each verse with the Hebrew alef bet.

The last 3 verses of chapter 3, verses 64, 65 and 66 (tav – ת), and the beginning of chapter 4, verse beginning with aleph again (א).
Chapter 4, verses 13 (mem – מ) through verse 22 (tav – ת), and the beginning of chapter 5.

Chapter 5 has no special attributes, as far as I know. (Which makes me think that chapter 5’s secrets are amazing!)

There are hidden treasures in the Hebrew!

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